September 30th, 2014

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Title:
Effects of Human Cumulus Cells on in Vitro Fertilization Outcomes and Its Significance in Short-Term Insemination
Authors:  Hai-xia Jin, Ph.D., Zhi-min Xin, Ph.D., Wen-yan Song, Ph.D., Shan-jun Dai, Ph.D., and Ying-pu Sun, Ph.D.
  OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of cumulus cells on in vitro fertilization.

STUDY DESIGN: Oocytes were retrieved from 47 patients (>10/patient) who underwent short-term insemination from August 2009 to June 2010. The oocytes from each patient were divided into a cumulus cell–free group (cumulus cells were removed from the incubation medium 4 hours after co-incubation of male and female gametes) with 389 oocytes and a cumulus cell group (cumulus cells were retained with the gametes until fertilization was evaluated 16–18 hours after co-incubation) with 402 oocytes.

RESULTS: Polyspermic fertilization was 0.96±1.14 in the cumulus cell–free group and 0.47±0.72 in the cumulus cell group with p<0.05. There were no significant differences in normal fertilization (5.96±1.73 vs. 6.55± 3.72), 1PN fertilization (0.06±0.25 vs. 0.09±0.28), fertilization failure (1.34±1.17 vs. 1.45±1.84), cleavage (6.06±2.04 vs. 6.51±3.94), high-quality embryo (3.94± 1.79 vs. 4.74±3.45) and usable embryo (5.06±1.86 vs. 5.68±3.98) between cumulus cell–free group and cumulus cell group, all with p>0.05.

CONCLUSION: In our study short-term insemination (4 hours) causes a statistical increase in polyspermic fertilization. In order to ensure correct oocyte fertilization and reduction of polyspermic fertilization, it is better to retain the cumulus cells for 16–18 hours.
Keywords:  artificial insemination; cumulus cells; fertilization, polyspermic
   
   
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